The Boot

Friday and Saturday 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., Sunday 7 to 10 p.m., Monday 7 p.m. to midnight

The Boot is an eclectic mix of Louisiana artists, Southern regional acts and bands covering blues, funk, soul, zydeco and more. The Boot is the musical heartbeat of the Delta.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Mavis Staples could've retired in good conscience years ago.

But slowing down isn't her style.

With her father, sisters and brother as The Staple Singers, her gospel songs scored the civil rights movement.

More than a half century later, as Staples nears 80, the decorated R&B star continues to train her soulful pipes on hope and resilience in her call for change.

J.Curtis / KEDM

90.3 KEDM Public Radio debuts a new music format this Memorial Day Weekend.  The new format is called The Boot, a reference to the nickname for the shape of Louisiana. 

"The Boot" features Louisiana artists and regional favorites.  It's a Southern gumbo made up of blues, soul, funk, zydeco, and swamp favorites.  Local favorite bands are also part of the mix.  

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify and Apple playlists at the bottom of the page.

As you may guess from the title of her third solo album, Leyla McCalla tackles social and economic issues pretty directly on The Capitalist Blues. The multi-instrumentalist and Carolina Chocolate Drops alumna sings about everything from injustice and poverty to her daughter's experience with elevated levels of lead.

When blues legend Buddy Guy calls you the real deal, that's no small compliment. Recently, Guy bestowed that honor on Mary Lane. After years of flying under the national radar, Lane has released a new album and is getting a well-deserved burst of recognition.

Growing up poor in Mississippi, Cedric Burnside didn't have running water.

It's a fact he highlights in the first song on his Grammy-nominated album, Benton County Relic.

In the upbeat, soulful song, titled "We Made It," Burnside croons verses like, "I came from nothing, I done been lower than low" and "Walk 3 miles every day, to have water in the house for another day."

Burnside grew up in his grandfather's house, along with many of his cousins. It wasn't until he was 12 years old that they finally got running water.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify and Apple Music playlists at the bottom of the page.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DON GONYEA, HOST:

Finally, today, we want to introduce you to Charley Crockett.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HERE AM I")

CHARLEY CROCKETT: (Singing) Here am I, all alone again. Here am I, all alone again.