Conrad Appel

Louisiana state senators Wednesday backed a $3.8 billion public school formula that includes all financing increases sought by Gov. John Bel Edwards.

Support for the K-12 spending plan came in a 37-1 vote that puts the Senate at odds with House Republicans, who stalled the same proposal in their chamber.

The formula that won Senate passage includes $140 million in increases: a $1,000 teacher pay raise, $500 raise for school support workers and $39 million in new block grant money for school districts.

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The Senate Education committee moved a measure that allows public school teachers to pray with students. The bill would further existing law that allows school employees to volunteer to supervise voluntary student-initiated, student-led prayer. Bossier City Senator Ryan Gatti.

 

Gatti says the improved legislation will make it easier for the kids to do what they want to.

 

The measure moves to the Senate floor. Metairie Senator Conrad Appel thinks the bill will only get the state sued and he voted against it.

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A heated exchange between legislators took place during a Senate Education Committee meeting. New Orleans Representative Joe Bouie was discussing a bill placing a moratorium on charter schools and what Tulane University research showed.  He said charter schools disciplinary programs are cruel and that many persons aged 16 to 24 are either out of work or not attending a school. Metairie Senator Conrad Appel became highly offended.

 

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A sort of “Re-do” bill has been pre-filed for the upcoming legislative regular session by Metairie Senator Conrad Appel. Senate Bill 31 disqualifies would be candidates from running for office after convicted of a felony for at least 15 years after they have served a sentence. Voters approved this legislation before, but the Louisiana Supreme Court tossed it out, because the version that appeared on the ballot was different than what legislators approved. So Appel wants to put it on the ballot again.