Tegan Wendland

Tegan Wendland is a freelance producer with a background in investigative news reporting. She currently produces the biweekly segment, Northshore Focus. 


Louisiana has the highest rate of deaths from COVID-19 in the nation and, according to Gov. John Bel Edwards, more than 70 percent of the people who have died so far were black.

Black people make up just 32 percent of the state's population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

The latest on the spread of coronavirus in New Orleans and across Louisiana today, April 6.

It's hard to stay home and socially isolate, but it's even harder if you don't have a home.

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Cheap natural gas and access to international ports are fueling a new industrial boom in Louisiana, along the stretch of land locals have long dubbed "cancer alley." The expansion is prompting new efforts to stop the factories, by residents concerned about the impact on their health.

As of Friday afternoon, there are now 33 confirmed cases of the coronavirus in Louisiana, and officials expect it to continue to spread. There’s been a run on toilet paper and food at grocery stores like Costco and Trader Joe’s as people prepare to quarantine. And it’s good to be prepared. But how dangerous is the virus, really?

Climate change is bringing heavier rain and bigger storms — new challenges for old cities.

Amsterdam is only a few feet above sea level and water has always been a part of the culture. There are more than 160 canals wind through the old city.

Nine Lousiana State University students have been diagnosed with the mumps, and the school said today that number is up from last week.

River parish residents are once again protesting the proliferation of petrochemical plants along the Mississippi River between New Orleans and Baton Rouge.

Advocates with several organizations, including the Coalition Against Death Alley, RISE St. James, The Concerned Citizens of St. John, the Louisiana Bucket Brigade, Justice and Beyond, 350 New Orleans and others will kick off a two-week march tonight in New Orleans.

The Trump administration is making major changes to the Endangered Species Act, which could affect some plants and animals in Louisiana.

The act, passed in the 1970’s, protects endangered plants and animals. At that time, the “pelican state” almost lost its state bird. The brown pelican was on the brink of extinction. Then, officials went to Florida and brought back juvenile pelicans to reestablish them in Louisiana. In 2009 they were officially taken off the list of endangered species.

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