Julie McCarthy

China has provoked international alarm by massing ships in the South China Sea near a reef claimed by both China and the Philippines. This week, Manila formally protested what it called a violation of "its sovereignty, sovereign rights, and jurisdiction." The United States and Western allies backed the Philippine call for China to immediately withdraw what appears to be a flotilla of fishing vessels.

Anger at restrictions imposed to contain the coronavirus pandemic swept into the streets of Europe on Saturday.

German police used water cannons, pepper spray and clubs on protesters rallying over the coronavirus lockdown in the town of Kassel in central Germany where demonstrators numbered some 20,000. Protests against government measures to rein in the pandemic were also reported in Austria, Britain, Finland, Romania and Switzerland.

Conservationists and wildlife enthusiasts are mourning the case of six lions that have been found dead and dismembered in what is a suspected to be a poisoning in one of Uganda's most renowned national parks.

Dead vultures provided a clue.

In a statement, the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) said the big cats were found Friday evening with "most of their bodies parts missing" in Queen Elizabeth National Park, their carcasses surrounded by the lifeless scavengers, "which points to possible poisoning of the lions."

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Willy Pulia, who turned 58 this week, is scared of getting COVID-19 – and for good reason. He's a nursing assistant at a hospital in Manila, which means he inevitably comes in contact with patients who've contracted the virus. He lives with his 96-year-old father. And he's not been vaccinated.

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Editor's note: This story contains graphic descriptions of sexual and physical violence.

Narcisa Claveria will turn 89 this year, two days before Christmas. Stepping onto the veranda of the family apartment, she takes a moment to check on her 92-year-old husband, who eyes visitors with a weary look. The couple lives in the hill town of Antipolo, an hour outside Manila, in the Philippines. Outwardly, she is grandmotherly, sweet and tranquil.

But when memories from 75 years ago are tapped, her mood changes.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

It's been 75 years since the end of World War II. And in the Philippines, victims are still haunted by an atrocity - the sexual enslavement of women by Japanese forces occupying the country. Some 40 of those women are still alive. NPR's Julie McCarthy has our report on one of those survivors. And a warning - we do have to describe violence and sexual assault to tell this story.

JULIE MCCARTHY: Narcisa Claveria invites us into the family apartment outside Manila, where we arrange ourselves in a small bedroom to escape the noise.

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