Frank Morris

Frank Morris has supervised the reporters in KCUR's newsroom since 1999. In addition to his managerial duties, Morris files regularly with National Public Radio. He’s covered everything from tornadoes to tax law for the network, in stories spanning eight states. His work has won dozens of awards, including four national Public Radio News Directors awards (PRNDIs) and several regional Edward R. Murrow awards. In 2012 he was honored to be named "Journalist of the Year" by the Heart of America Press Club.

Morris grew up in rural Kansas listening to KHCC, spun records at KJHK throughout college at the University of Kansas, and cut his teeth in journalism as an intern for Kansas Public Radio, in the Kansas statehouse.

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GALLIANO, La. — Hurricane Ida stripped thousands of residents in this state of their power, their livelihoods, and in wrecking their homes, it dropped their net worth almost to zero.

In this town, it's easy to see the carnage of neighborhoods when driving around. Trailers lull crushed on their sides. In some lots there's no semblance of a building at all, just wadded-up rubble, ruined furnishings and broken glass.

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Hurricane Ida hit Louisiana more than two weeks ago, but the recovery still hasn't begun for thousands of ravaged households. They've been getting by without electricity and sometimes even without water. NPR's Frank Morris reports.

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Updated August 24, 2021 at 3:04 PM ET

New state laws tightening voting restrictions come in two basic varieties: those that make it harder to cast a vote and those making it more difficult to get registered to vote in the first place.

In Kansas, one law effectively shuts down voter registration drives.

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Updated June 27, 2021 at 7:41 AM ET

Last Fourth of July some fireworks stores went dark because they ran out of product. The same thing may happen again this year.

Demand for consumer fireworks is near all-time highs, but logistics bottlenecks are cutting the supply by about 30%, boosting prices and robbing some retailers of a chance to cash in on what might otherwise have been their best year ever, according to Mike Collar, president of Winco Fireworks, one of the largest U.S. importers.

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