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Hurricane Warning - Bienville, Claiborne, Jackson, Lincoln, Natchitoches, Red River, Webster, Winn

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NWS Shreveport
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Hurricane Laura Local Statement Advisory Number 31
National Weather Service Shreveport LA AL132020
1043 AM CDT Thu Aug 27 2020

This product covers ArkLaTex and the Four State Region

**LAURA STILL A HURRICANE AS IT MOVES THROUGH CENTRAL LOUISIANA**

NEW INFORMATION
---------------

* CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS:
- The Tropical Storm Warning has been cancelled for Angelina,
Gregg, Nacogdoches, and Rusk
- The Hurricane Warning has been cancelled and a Tropical Storm
Warning has been issued for Grant and Sabine

* CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS:
- A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Bossier, Bowie,
Caddo, Caldwell, Cass, Columbia, De Soto, Grant, Harrison,
Hempstead, Howard, La Salle, Lafayette, Little River, Marion,
Miller, Nevada, Ouachita, Panola, Sabine, Sabine, San
Augustine, Sevier, Shelby, Union, and Union
- A Hurricane Warning is in effect for Bienville, Claiborne,
Jackson, Lincoln, Natchitoches, Red River, Webster, and Winn

* STORM INFORMATION:
- About 60 miles southeast of Shreveport LA
- 31.9N 93.1W
- Storm Intensity 75 mph
- Movement North or 5 degrees at 16 mph

SITUATION OVERVIEW
------------------

Hurricane Laura is now moving north into North Louisiana. Laura
will continue to slowly weaken through the
course of the day and will likely weaken to below hurricane
strength in a few hours as it presses toward the Louisiana and
Arkansas border by early afternoon. Although Laura will continue
to slowly weaken, it will continue to bring gusty winds and
heavy rain to portions of the Arklamiss into early
this evening. As Laura continues to move farther inland,
damaging wind gusts and inland flooding are expected to be the
main threats across the eastern two-thirds of the Four State
region, while isolated tornadoes should remain more confined to
the Arklamiss. Due to Laura tracking a little farther east than
anticipated, it is looking like some locations in East Texas
along and west of a Clarksville to Lufkin line will be spared
the worst of the impacts while conditions slowly improve this
this afternoon in many other areas south of the I-20 corridor.

POTENTIAL IMPACTS
-----------------

* WIND:
Potential impacts from the main wind event are now unfolding across
portions of Central and North Central Louisiana. Remain well
sheltered from life-threatening wind having possible extensive
impacts. If realized, these impacts include:

- Roof damage to sturdy buildings, with some having
window, door, and garage door failures leading to structural
damage. Mobile homes severely damaged. Damage could be
accentuated by airborne projectiles.
- Many large trees uprooted along with fences and roadway
signs blown over. Downed trees will become more common as
the ground gets saturated with heavy rain.
- Some roads impassable from debris, and more within urban
or heavily wooded places. Several access routes could be
impassable.
- Large areas with power and communications outages.

Potential impacts from the main wind event are also now unfolding
across Southwest and South Central Arkansas, the remainder of
Central and Northwestern Louisiana, and portions of East Texas
east of a Lufkin to Clarksville line. If realized, these impacts
include:

- Limited roof and shingle damage possible.
- Large branches downed and some trees uprooted. Downed trees
will become more common as the ground gets saturated with
heavy rain.
- Some roads may become blocked by downed trees.
- Scattered areas with power and communications outages.

Elsewhere across the ArkLaTex, little to no impact is
anticipated.

* FLOODING RAIN:
Potential impacts from the flooding rain are still unfolding
across Southwest and South Central Arkansas, North and Central
Louisiana, East Texas east of an Alto to Kilgore and
Clarksville line, and also McCurtain County Oklahoma. Potential
impacts include:

- Major rainfall flooding may prompt many evacuations and
rescues.
- Small streams, creeks, bayous, and ditches may rapidly
overflow their banks in multiple places.
- Flood waters can enter many structures within multiple
communities. Many places where flood waters may cover escape
routes. Streets and parking lots become flooded with
underpasses submerged. Driving conditions become dangerous.
- Many road and bridge closures with some weakened or washed
out.

Protect against dangerous rainfall flooding having possible
significant impacts across the rest of the Four State region

* TORNADOES:
Potential impacts from tornadoes are still unfolding across
South Central Arkansas and portions of North and Central Louisiana
east of a Bossier City to Zwolle line. Remain well braced against
a tornado event having possible limited impacts. If realized,
these impacts include:

- The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution
of emergency plans during tropical events.
- A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power
and communications disruptions.
- Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys
toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned,
large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow-rooted trees
knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats
pulled from moorings.

Elsewhere across ArkLaTex, little to no impact is anticipated.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS
----------------------------------

* EVACUATIONS:

No evacuations at this time. Heed instructions from local
emergency management officials. Assess the risk from wind,
falling trees, and flooding at your location, although be
extremely cautious about trying to move to a different location
if the weather has already greatly deteriorated at your location.

* OTHER PREPAREDNESS INFORMATION:

Now is the time to stay inside and away from windows. Listen for
updates and be ready in case you lose electrical power. Keep a
battery-powered radio, charged cell phone and flashlight handy.

During the peak of the storm be ready to move quickly. Keep your
shoes on and rain gear handy. Boots and athletic shoes offer the best
foot protection if you become unexpectedly exposed to the weather.

Do not be a thrill seeker or risk your life for senseless photos or
videos.

Quickly move to the safest place within your shelter if it begins to
fail, preferably an interior room on the lowest floor as long as
flooding is not a concern.

If you are in a location prone to flooding, be prepared to move
to nearby higher ground quickly.

If a tornado warning is issued for your area, quickly move to the
safest place within your shelter. Protect your head and body.

* ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION:
- For information on appropriate preparations see ready.gov
- For information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.org
- For additional disaster preparedness information see redcross.org

NEXT UPDATE
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Shreveport LA around 2 PM CDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.

Originally from Monroe, Cory has worked in a variety of media. He has worked in television news and spent seven years as a TV sports play-by-play announcer. He was also creative director for a television advertising department and worked extensively as a photojournalist. Cory has lived in both Dallas and New Orleans.