Money

Tax Credits / Flickr.com / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Not everyone is rich. So, does the profession of financial planning have anything to offer to the average or even poor person? What could just plain old regular folks do to live better?

I have met individuals worth multiple millions who had no time, no love and no peace in their lives. I have also met others who could list all their possessions on the back of a napkin whose family, community and lifestyle were a constant source of joy to them.

So let’s begin with the understanding that wealth never made anyone rich and poverty never made anyone…well, poor.

Image courtesy of jk1991 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Sometimes the numbers seem to say one thing, but real life screams something else.

That’s the case when I talk to young people with lots and lots of college debt to pay off.

The voices in their head say something like this:

Ken Teegardin / Flickr.com http://tinyurl.com/h862a6a

Twenty-five years ago, Bob Castiglione told me, Money is not math, and math is not money. At the time I just scratched my head (till all my hair fell out), but I finally figured out what he meant.

The advent of personal computers thirty years ago enabled those of us in the fledgling financial planning community to crunch numbers to our hearts content. Thus enabled to calculate the numerical nuances of infinite financial possibilities, financial planners began producing elaborate projections of potential financial futures.

Pages