college

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Louisiana has the highest FAFSA submission rates in the nation according to a new report. That means more students than ever are applying to see what financial aid they qualify for when it comes to post-secondary education. Ed-Tech Senior Consultant Stephanie Marcum says the 84 percent participation rate comes down to a new mandate for graduating high school seniors.

It appears that The board of secondary education has implicated a policy for incoming graduate students that they MUST complete a FAFSA or TOPS application. 

The final act of this year’s special session trilogy is less than a week away, with the administration and many legislators scrambling to find some extra cash for programs like TOPS, which is facing a 30 percent cut. House Appropriations Chairman Cameron Henry says the Department of Health is one place the state should look if it wants to plug the budget gaps.

 

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Springtime is acceptance letter season for most college bound high school students, and the state’s budget uncertainty is causing many to rethink whether they want to attend school in Louisiana. LSU president F. King Alexander is calling on legislators to find a budget solution that funds higher ed and TOPS by the end of the February special session.

 

Alexander says there was a noticeable impact the last time the state failed to properly fund TOPS in a timely manner.

 

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Sometimes the numbers seem to say one thing, but real life screams something else.

That’s the case when I talk to young people with lots and lots of college debt to pay off.

The voices in their head say something like this:

Few things cost more than unexamined assumptions.

Never is this more true than when parents begin thinking about sending their first child to college.

Where will Junior go to college? And why? And who is driving this decision?

I remember a meeting with two parents who wanted to send their child to their alma mater, which was now a very expensive private school much more expensive than when they went. They would have had to borrow the money, so I simply asked them, Why are you doing this?