James Doubek

James Doubek is an associate producer and reporter for NPR. He frequently covers breaking news for NPR.org and NPR's hourly newscast. In 2018, he reported feature stories for NPR's business desk on topics including electric scooters, cryptocurrency, and small business owners who lost out when Amazon made a deal with Apple.

In the fall of that year, Doubek was selected for NPR's internal enrichment rotation to work as an audio producer for Weekend Edition. He spent two months pitching, producing, and editing interviews and pieces for broadcast.

As an associate producer for NPR's digital content team, Doubek edits online stories and manages NPR's website and social media presence.

He got his start at NPR as an intern at the Washington Desk, where he made frequent trips to the Supreme Court and reported on political campaigns.

Longtime conspiracy theorist and perennial presidential candidate Lyndon LaRouche died on Tuesday at age 96, his organization said in a statement.

LaRouche ran for president eight times from 1976 through 2004, running first with the now-defunct U.S. Labor Party and later as a Democrat.

The Federal Trade Commission is celebrating Valentine's Day by reminding people to not get scammed when looking for love.

The agency received more than 21,000 reports about romance scams in 2018, with total reported losses of $143 million.

Of those who said they lost money in a romance scam, the median amount lost was $2,600 — seven times more than the median loss for other types of frauds tracked by the FTC.

The Department of Justice is asking its internal inspector to investigate power and heating outages that left many inmates at a Brooklyn jail in cold and dark cells as temperatures fell below freezing in New York City.

The announcement came in response to a request for an investigation by Democratic Reps. Jerrold Nadler and Nydia Velázquez of New York and other Democrats.

Updated on May 28

What's your superstitious sports ritual?

Is it a prayer, wearing a special T-shirt, not washing your socks or eating a special sandwich? With the Super Bowl this Sunday, we're looking at you Patriots and Rams fans in particular. What are you doing to help ensure your team wins?

NPR's Weekend Edition wants to hear from you. Share your story with us in the form below, or here. A producer may get in touch.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Bitcoin has lost a lot of its value this month. Financial experts aren't sure why. And they're not sure where the popular cryptocurrency will go next.

Prices fell last weekend, reaching below $3,600 at one point — about 40 percent less from where it had been just two weeks earlier. Prices continued down Monday but closed slightly up Tuesday.

Then they surged, topping $4,300 Wednesday — though that's nowhere near the $6,000 or more the cryptocurrency commanded for several months until mid-November.

Retailers opened their doors Friday morning — or simply left them open since Thursday night — for a busy Black Friday shopping day both in stores and online.

A big car company is going small. Ford is buying electric scooter company Spin.

Ford and Spin won't confirm the price tag, but reports put the purchase price at $100 million and an overall investment from Ford of $200 million.

This Sunday 100 years ago, Nov. 11, 1918, the Allies of World War I and Germany agreed to a cease-fire signifying the end of the "war to end all wars."

Representatives of the two sides signed the agreement in Compiègne Forest, in northern France, on the day of the year now recognized as Armistice Day.

It came into effect at 11 a.m. French time: "the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month."

Fenton Caldwell was in France that day, too — or, technically, over it. Hundreds of miles to the south, near Bordeaux.

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