Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

The World Anti-Doping Agency will review its ban on cannabis, in what the agency says is a response to "requests from a number of stakeholders" in international athletics. But it's not clear when, or if, a change to the controversial policy might take effect: cannabis will remain forbidden for the 2022 athletic season.

Updated September 14, 2021 at 10:51 PM ET

Tropical Depression Nicholas has drenched the Houston metro area as the large storm creeps over southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana. The system, which made landfall early Tuesday morning as a hurricane, is expected to drop another 5 to 10 inches of rain on a broad area from the northern Texas coast to the western Florida Panhandle through Thursday.

"Life-threatening flash flooding" is possible, particularly in urban areas, the National Hurricane Center said.

The famed Squaw Valley ski resort near Lake Tahoe is changing its name, after a long debate and input from Native American tribes. The leadership of the resort, which will now be known as Palisades Tahoe, says, "The old name was derogatory and offensive."

The California resort made the decision to change the name last summer, as many U.S. institutions and communities contemplated the legacy of centuries of racism. In recent decades, several other locations, in states from Minnesota to Oregon, have dropped the term from place names.

Updated September 14, 2021 at 4:55 AM ET

Hurricane Nicholas made landfall along the Texas coast early Tuesday morning, bringing with it heavy wind, rain and dangerous storm surge threats.

The Category 1 hurricane made landfall in Texas just before 2 a.m. ET along the Matagorda Peninsula, a strip of land just off the southeastern coast of Texas, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Nobody told Peter Hemans to spend the night at Hackensack Middle School last week, as terrible storms arrived in New Jersey. But Hemans did it anyway — and he's now being praised for helping the school avoid the flooding brought on by Hurricane Ida's remnants.

His story is poignant and sad, and his concerns are widely held — but when Tennessee teenager Grady Knox stood up at a county school board meeting to explain why he wants masks in schools, adults at the meeting mocked and heckled the high school student.

"This time last year, my grandmother, who was a former teacher at the Rutherford County school system died of COVID because someone wasn't wearing a mask," Knox, who is a junior at Central Magnet School, said at Tuesday night's board meeting.

The newly installed Taliban regime will forbid Afghan women from playing cricket and other sports where their bodies might be seen, a senior official told Australian public broadcaster SBS.

"I don't think women will be allowed to play cricket because it is not necessary that women should play cricket," said Ahmadullah Wasiq, deputy head of the Taliban's cultural commission, according to a translation by SBS.

The deputy mayor of Airmont, N.Y., has been arrested on multiple weapons charges after police discovered an arsenal of illegal guns in his house — including 16 assault weapons and 13 silencers, according to the district attorney's office. Investigators said they also found a stash of fake federal IDs, including FBI credentials.

Deputy Mayor Brian Downey, 47, now faces more than 30 state and federal criminal counts.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is "completely incorrect" to suggest vaccines are a personal choice with no broad implications, says Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country's top infectious disease authority.

"If [DeSantis] feels that vaccines are not important for people, that they're just important for some people, that's completely incorrect," Fauci said after being asked about DeSantis' views during an interview Tuesday with CNN.

Updated September 7, 2021 at 11:52 AM ET

The Human Rights Campaign has ousted Alphonso David as its president, saying it fired him for cause in the wake of a report that found he helped former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo respond to sexual misconduct allegations.

David's exit is contentious, with both sides accusing the other of spreading falsehoods.

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