All Things Considered

WEEKDAY AFTERNOONS AT 3

In-depth reporting has transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two and a half hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. 

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Three Senate Democrats filed a lawsuit today seeking to stop Matthew Whitaker from serving as acting attorney general. President Trump appointed Whitaker to temporarily fill the post after Jeff Sessions was forced out.

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Leading up to the midterm elections, Native American tribes in North Dakota were worried about turnout because of a strict new voter ID law. Field organizers knocked on doors ahead of election night.

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As flames consume parts of California, an unexpected group of firefighters has put their lives at risk to protect communities: prison inmates.

For $2 per day — and another $1 an hour when battling fires — qualified inmates can volunteer to help authorities combat fires.

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School shootings have taken a terrible human toll. They have also been a boon to the business of security technology.

Over the summer, Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Cox saw an array of items on display at an expo in Orlando, Fla. He and fellow reporter Steven Rich went on to investigate whether any of the technology being promoted and sold really helps save lives.

One minute, Seamus Hughes was reading the book Dragons Love Tacos to his son. A few minutes later, after putting him to bed, Hughes was back on his computer, stumbling on what could be one of the most closely guarded secrets within the U.S. government: The Justice Department may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

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