Travis Lux

Travis Lux primarily contributes science and health stories to Louisiana's Lab. He studied anthropology and sociology at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, and picked up his first microphone at the Transom Story Workshop in Woods Hole, MA. In his spare time he loves to cook -- especially soups and casseroles. 

Just ahead of the 13th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, a museum dedicated to educating people about the storm -- and the levee breaches -- has opened in Gentilly.

The Flooded House Museum is located at 4918 Warrington Dr. in Gentilly. It was severely damaged when the London Avenue Canal levee, which runs directly behind it, failed during the storm.

 

It’s been redone to look like it did the day before the levees broke and flooded the city. Visitors can peer in through the windows, like you would a dollhouse or diorama.

The flooding of August 5th, 2017 revealed that several pumps, and the generators that power them, were broken.

 

Most of that equipment has now been fixed, but last week, lawyers filed a class-action lawsuit against the New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans over damages caused by the flood waters.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with New Orleans Advocate reporter Jeff Adelson about the suit, and what comes next.

Every summer, a dead zone forms in the Gulf of Mexico. It’s an area with so little oxygen that marine life can’t survive, caused mostly by agricultural fertilizers that wash down the Mississippi River.

 

According to a new study from the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON), it’s much smaller this year. But, that might not necessarily be a sign of progress.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: sharks, the evironmental impact of feral cats, and a new study links temperature and suicide.

WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with Joan Meiners from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune about the week in coastal news.

The Army Corps of Engineers has a system for classifying river and hurricane levees across the country. On Thursday, officials announced the final classifications for Southeast Louisiana. From Baton Rouge to New Orleans levee systems are considered “Moderate to High Risk.”

Though that may sound concerning, the Army Corps stresses that these classifications are not safety ratings. New Orleans District commander Colonel Mike Clancy says the levees themselves are in good shape.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, we take a look at barrier islands — what they do, and why the state is creating them artificially. Plus, we explore what less sediment in the Mississippi River could mean for coastal restoration and the return of a Jean Lafitte tradition: pirogue races.

When the Mississippi River flooded this spring, tons of water gushed through the Bonnet Carré Spillway, and into Lake Pontchartrain. The spillway is a big swath of open land, and it relieves the swollen river.

One group of forecasters has decreased its 2018 hurricane season forecast from above-average to below-average.

There are typically about 12 named storms in the Atlantic during hurricane season.

According to a new report, more than 40,000 Louisiana homes and 99,00 Louisiana residents are at risk of chronic flooding due to rising seas in the next 30 years. In total, 311,000 homes may be at risk across the United States.

 

The report was published by the Union of Concerned Scientists, a climate change advocacy group. Researchers made the calculation by combining sea level rise predictions with data from Zillow, an online real estate company.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, the state gets more money to figure out how to stop the invasive bug killing the coastal marsh. Plus, two state legislators get into bar fight over coastal restoration.

 

Tristan Baurick from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune breaks down the week in coastal news with WWNO’s Travis Lux.

Pages